CSI: Your Floor Routine

OK, listen up. Today, I’m CSIing the D scores from the floor routines at US Classic to check out what elements people are performing, what’s actually receiving credit, and what the trends are in that regard.

For each routine, the left column is the composition that the gymnast attempted at Classic and the D score that would have been given had every attempted skill been completed successfully. In the right column, I’ve noted where I believe a different skill was awarded. That’s not based on any knowledge of what the judges actually did, just on watching the routine, seeing the D score that was given, and making some assumptions.

And remember to watch out for that damn domestic stick bonus (JUST GET RID OF IT).


MyKayla Skinner – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double double layout – I
Front tuck through to double tuck full – A + E
Leg-up hop full – C
Switch leap full – D Switch leap 1/2 – C
Double double tucked – H
Split leap 1.5 – D
Wolf turn double – D Wolf turn single – A
Back 1.5 through to back tuck – C + A
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – IHEC – 2.5 Acro – IHEC – 2.5
Dance – DDDC – 1.5 Dance – DCCA – 1.1
CV – 0.0 CV – 0.0
Total D – 6.0 Total D – 5.6

Even with the aborted final pass, Skinner was still going for a 6.0 D score at Classic, which would have been among the very highest attempted. She definitely didn’t get credit for the double wolf turn since she went to her knee after the first turn because DONE. That was a D-score destroyer here because the wolf single is only an A, and the situation on the last pass meant she didn’t have the backup “just in case” C element she otherwise would have.

Counting that A skill took her D score down three tenths, the other tenth most likely coming from a downgrade of the switch leap full, which was landed under-rotated, though you could argue it was one of the other dance elements instead.

If Skinner does the 1.5 through to double tuck at nationals, which I assume is the intent, she would be up to 6.2 if receiving credit for everything.


Gabby Perea – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Full-twisting double tuck – E
Front tuck through to back 2.5 – A + D
Wolf turn triple – E Wolf turn double – D
Wolf turn double – D Repeated skill
Switch leap – B
Switch leap full – D
Double pike – D
Split leap 1.5 – D Split leap full – C
Back 2/1 – C
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – EDDC – 1.6 Acro – EDDC – 1.6
Dance – EDDD – 1.7 Dance – DDCB – 1.3
CV – 0.0 CV – 0.0
Total D – 5.3 Total D – 4.9

The victim of wolf turn destruction in the senior ranks at this meet was Gabby Perea, who was under on her triple wolf attempt, which mean the subsequent double wolf was a repeated skill and received no credit at all. You’ll note in this routine, after the wolf triple attempt, Perea moves her leg to where it would have finished in order to begin her double wolf, which you should never do because it signals to the judges that you were under on the previous skill.

The wolf turns don’t account for all the downgrades Perea received, so I’d say she also didn’t get the split leap 1.5, but you could argue for the switch leap full. There was downgrade potential on both.


Shilese Jones – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double double tucked – H
Double Arabian – E
Wolf turn triple – E Wolf turn double – D
Full-twisting double tuck – E
L turn double – D L turn single – B
Leg-up hop full – C
Switch side 1/2 – C Switch side – B
Double tuck – D
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – HEED – 2.2 Acro – HEED – 2.2
Dance – EDCC – 1.5 Dance – DCBB – 1.1
CV – 0.0 CV – 0.0
Total D – 5.7 Total D – 5.3

Jones lost quite a bit of her intended D on floor. That definitely includes the wolf turn triple, which was short of the full three turns, and I’m saying that switch side 1/2 was not around enough for credit as well. That accounts for two of the four tenths that Jones lost, so I’m thinking the L turn double must have been dropped down to a single. The leg stays in position longer than necessary, but that heel drops early.


Morgan Hurd – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double layout – F
Front layout + Front 2/1 – B + D – 0.1 CV
Switch ring – C
Split leap 1.5 – D Split leap full – C
Double tuck – D Stick bonus – +0.1
Split ring full – D Split leap full – repeated skill
Split jump full – C
Double pike – D
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – FDDD – 1.8 Acro – FDDDB – 2.0
Dance – DDCC – 1.4 Dance – CCC – 0.9
CV – 0.1 CV – 0.1, Stick bonus – 0.1
Total D – 5.3 Total D – 5.1

I didn’t realize quite how much was going on in the evaluation of Hurd’s floor routine until I went through, mostly just thinking, “Oh, she downgraded, 5.1, yeah, la la la.”

With the stick bonus from the double tuck presumably taking her up a tenth, we’re looking at three tenths lost elsewhere. The downgrade of the split leap full makes sense, but to come up with another two tenths, I’m guessing they must have not given her the ring position on the split ring full—there’s not a lot of back arch there—meaning it would be a split leap full and a repeated skill. That gets us down to 5.1.

And yes, the irony of Morgan Hurd being the one who gets a ring position downgraded should be noted.


Jade Carey – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double double layout – I
Double L turn – D Single L turn – B
Double layout full – H Stick bonus – 0.1
Leg-up hop full – C
Switch leap full – D Switch leap 1/2 – C
Double double tucked – H
Split leap full – C
Front tuck through to double tuck – A + D
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro –  IHHD – 2.9 Acro – IHHD – 2.9
Dance – DDCC – 1.4 Dance – CCCB – 1.1
CV – 0.0 CV – 0.0, Stick bonus – 0.1
Total D – 6.3 Total D – 6.1

Dropping her heel on the double L turn probably accounts for two tenths being taken from Carey’s D score since the single L being just a B element. She lost exactly two tenths from her intended D, but since she would have received the stick bonus for her second pass, we have to come up with something else on one of the leaps. It’s a Pandora’s box of possibilities there, but I’m thinking it was the switch leap 1/2 that got her.


Jordan Chiles – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double held-leg turn – D
Double layout – F
Back 1.5 through to double tuck – C + D – 0.1 CV
Switch ring – C
Split leap 1.5 – D Split leap full – C
Front 2/1 – D
Switch leap full – D Switch leap 1/2 – C
Double pike – D
Full twist to front support – A
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – FDDD – 1.8 Acro – FDDD – 1.8
Dance – DDDC – 1.5 Dance – DCCC – 1.3
CV – 0.1 CV – 0.1
Total D – 5.4 Total D – 5.2

Chiles lost two tenths from her intended D score, which isn’t disastrous. You could say they come from dropping the held-leg double turn early, but I’m going with the split leaps being under-turned, each accounting for a tenth.


Sloane Blakely – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Full-twisting double tuck – E
Switch ring – C
Split leap full – C
Double Y spin – D Single Y spin – B
Double Arabian – E
Double pike – D
Wolf turn double – D
Switch leap 1/2 – C
Double tuck – D
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – EEDD – 1.8 Acro – EEDD – 1.8
Dance – DDCC – 1.4 Dance – DCCC – 1.3
CV – 0.0 CV – 0.0
Total D – 5.2 Total D – 5.1

Blakely gets the Good Backup Composition award because she has an extra backup dance element in her routine.

When she doesn’t receive credit for the double Y spin, as happened here, she isn’t immediately forced to count a B skill for the single Y because she has that extra switch leap 1/2 toward the end. It’s otherwise a non-counting skill, but it can be used as a counting C element here so that she’s losing only one tenth instead of two.


Grace McCallum – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double double tucked – H
Front layout + Front 2/1 + Front tuck – B + D + A – 0.2 CV
Switch ring leap – C
Switch leap 1/2 – C
Wolf turn triple – E
Full-twisting double tuck – E Stick bonus – 0.1
Split leap 1.5 – D Split leap full – C
Double tuck – D
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – HEDD – 2.1 Acro – HEDD – 2.1
Dance – EDCC – 1.5 Dance – EDCC – 1.5
CV – 0.2 CV – 0.2, Stick bonus – 0.1
Total D – 5.8 Total D – 5.8

McCallum enjoyed a case of code equilibrium here, where the stick bonus for her full-twisting double tuck counteracted what I would say was short rotation on her split leap 1.5 attempt, bringing her to exactly her intended 5.8 D score in the end.


Alexis Jeffrey – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double Arabian – E
Wolf turn double – D
Double pike – D Stick bonus 0.1
Leg-up hop full – C Leg-up hop 1/2 – B
Switch side 1/2 – C
Straddle jump 1/1 + Double stag – C + B
Double tuck – D
Back 2/1 – C
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – EDDC – 1.6 Acro – EDDC – 1.6
Dance – DCCC – 1.3 Dance – DCCB – 1.2
CV – 0.0 CV – 0.0, Stick bonus 0.1
Total D – 4.9 Total D – 4.9

Jeffrey appears to have experienced the same phenomenon, sticking on her double pike and presumably losing credit somewhere else in order to get her to exactly 4.9. I suppose I’d go with the leg-up hop full, where the leg dropped early, though it was no different than a bunch of others in this competition, at least a few of which must have received credit.


Olivia Hollingsworth – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Split jump full – C
Full-twisting double tuck + Split jump – E + A – 0.1 CV
Back 1.5 through to double tuck – C + D – 0.1 CV
Split leap full – C
Switch leap full – D Switch leap 1/2 – C
Front tuck through to back 2/1 – A + C
Wolf turn single – A
Double pike – D Stick bonus 0.1
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – EDDCC – 1.9 Acro – EDDCC – 1.9
Dance – DCC – 1.0 Dance – CCC – 0.9
CV – 0.2 CV – 0.2, Stick bonus 0.1
Total D – 5.1 Total D – 5.1

Samesies for Hollingsworth. She stuck her final pass, which counteracted the definite under-rotation on the switch leap full and kept her at her intended 5.1.


The rest of the field appears to have received credit for all skills as intended on floor, but since I couldn’t be sure of that until I went through the routines, I will post them here anyway in case you’re interesting in brushing up on your CoP.

Leanne Wong – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Arabian double pike + Stag jump – F + A = 0.1 CV
Back 3.5 – F
Switch ring – C
Leg-up hop full – C
Back 2.5 + Front layout – D + B – 0.1 CV
Straddle jump full – C
Double L turn + Full turn – D + A
Back 3/1 – E
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – FFED – 2.1 Acro – FFED – 2.1
Dance – DCCC – 1.3 Dance – DCCC – 1.3
CV – 0.2 CV – 0.2
Total D – 5.6 Total D – 5.6

Aleah Finnegan – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double double tucked – H
Double Arabian + Stag jump – E + A – 0.1 CV
Switch ring 1/2 – D
Split jump full – C
Full turn – A
Back 2.5 + Front layout – D + B – 0.1 CV
Switch ring – C
Split leap full – C
Front 2/1 – D
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – HEDD – 2.1 Acro – HEDD – 2.1
Dance – DCCC – 1.3 Dance – DCCC – 1.3
CV – 0.2 CV – 0.2
Total D – 5.5 Total D – 5.5

Riley McCusker – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Full-twisting double tuck – E
Front 2/1 + Front tuck + Stag jump – D + B + A – 0.1 CV
Split leap full – C
Double pike – D
Wolf turn triple – E
Switch ring – C
Switch leap full – D
Double tuck – D
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro –  EDDD – 1.7 Acro –  EDDD – 1.7
Dance – EDCC  – 1.5 Dance – EDCC  – 1.5
CV – 0.1 CV – 0.1
Total D – 5.3 Total D – 5.3

The key to McCusker’s success. Full credit for everything she attempted on both beam and floor.


Simone Biles – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double layout full + Split jump – H + A – 0.1 CV
Double layout 1/2 + Front layout – G + B – 0.2 CV
Switch leap full – D
Wolf turn double – D
Front full through to full-twisting double tuck
C + E – 0.2 CV
Switch leap – B
Split leap 1.5 – D
Double double tucked – H
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – HHGEC – 3.1 Acro – HHGEC – 3.1
Dance – DDD – 1.2 Dance – DDD – 1.2
CV – 0.5 CV – 0.5
Total D – 6.8 Total D – 6.8

If we’re being honest, that split 1.5 should have been downgraded. A lot of them were in this competition.


Kara Eaker – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Front layout + Front 2/1 + Front tuck
B + D + A – 0.2 CV
Back 3/1 – E
Double Y turn – D
Back 2.5 + Front 1/1 – D + C = 0.2 CV
Switch ring – C
Split leap full – C
Double pike – D
Switch ring 1/2 – D ??
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – EDDD – 1.7 Acro – EDDD – 1.7
Dance – DDCC – 1.4 Dance – DDCC – 1.4
CV – 0.4 CV – 0.4
Total D – 5.5 Total D – 5.5

Eaker got her full intended D score, which seems to indicate she got that final switch ring 1/2, but there wasn’t enough of a half twist after that ring for me.


Jaylene Gilstrap – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double pike – D
Front layout + Front full – B + C
Split leap full – C
Double tuck – D
Switch leap – B
Switch ring – C
Wolf turn double – D
Back 2/1 – C
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – DDCC – 1.4 Acro – DDCC – 1.4
Dance – DCCB – 1.2 Dance – DCCB – 1.2
CV – 0.0 CV – 0.4
Total D – 4.6 Total D – 4.6

Faith Torrez – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Full-twisting double layout – H
Split leap full – C
Double layout – F
Switch leap – B
Switch leap 1/2 – C
Wolf turn double – D
Front tuck through to double tuck – A + D
Double pike – D
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – HFDD – 2.2 Acro – HFDD – 2.2
Dance – DCCB – 1.2 Dance – DCCB – 1.2
CV – 0.0 CV – 0.0
Total D – 5.4 Total D – 5.4

Abigael Vides – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Split jump full – C
Full-twisting double tuck – E
Switch leap – B
Split leap full – C
Front 2/1 – D
Switch leap 1/2 – C
Double pike – D
Double turn – B
Double tuck – D
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – EDDD – 1.7 Acro – EDDD – 1.7
Dance – CCCB – 1.1 Dance – CCCB – 1.1
CV – 0.0 CV – 0.0
Total D – 4.8 Total D – 4.8

I would say Vides is dangerously close to not having a passage of dance with the halting motion and change of direction after the switch leap, but she got credit for it.


Emily Lee – Floor
Attempted routine
Credited routine
Double layout – F
Back 2.5 + Front full – D + C – 0.2 CV
Switch ring – C
Switch leap 1/2 – C
Double tuck – D
Double turn – B
Straddle jump full – C
Double pike – D
CR – 2.0 CR – 2.0
Acro – FDDDC – 2.1 Acro – FDDDC – 2.1
Dance – CCC – 0.9 Dance – CCC – 0.9
CV – 0.2 CV – 0.2
Total D – 5.2 Total D – 5.2

 

15 thoughts on “CSI: Your Floor Routine”

  1. This is so helpful! As someone who is a long-time fan (but not really well-versed on the various skills) posts like this really help me to learn how to identify the skills. Now can Nastia and Tim just use the same nomenclature as you so we understand? 🙂

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  2. Shouldn’t Aleah have gotten a stick bonus for the 2.5 to Layout? Which begs the question, what else was downgraded? I’d go with the switch ring half, but that makes problems with repeated elements elsewhere.

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  3. Does Tom Forster understand that it is no longer the 1980s and you need more than big tumbles? He really needs to get the national team working on their dance elements as these seem to have declined drastically in the past year or so. Don’t even get me started on beam and the number of 120 degree “split” jumps at Classic!

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    1. It does seem weird that so many US gymnasts have multiple E and F+ acro skills but relatively low D-scores.

      Eaker and Biles seem to be the only ones really going after tenths on CV.

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      1. Floor is extremely hard to generate difficulty on because those massive E and F passes generally cannot be done in combination. IMO, the only valuable connections on floor are the A+A+E and C+E indirect acro for 0.2, A+E direct acro for 0.2, and A+E dance for 0.1.

        The C+D direct acro for 0.2 seems valuable, but is equivalent to doing standalone D and E skills. Any other connection for 0.1 likely has more deductions than is worth – i.e. a back 1.5 indirect into double tuck for a measly 0.1 is way more trouble and more difficult than it’s worth.

        Alyona Schennikova had the right idea with her punch front layout, double front, stag leap which is equivalent to an H skill but we saw how hard and inconsistent that was for her.

        I’m all for gymnasts trying to pad their difficulty with connections because it’s the only way to boost D-scores if you’re not a superstar tumbler.

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      2. Its biles by miles on d score . no one else even close… Only carey and skinner has a potential d score higher than 6….

        Let see if skinner can also get the iple double into her routine..

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      3. The other challenge with floor is that you are only allowed to do four tumbling runs (which is a good thing) and it’s difficult to do more than one D+ skill per tumbling run. So then you have to get four of your skills from dance. And we have seen how tough it is to get credit for dance skills.

        Floor used to be my favourite event but it is a mess now. So many of the the D and E dance elements are ugly. I miss seeing combination tumbling too, I wish they upped the CV incentive on floor and could do something about these ugly dance skills. And wolf turns on floor should just be taken out of the code.

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      4. I wouldn’t say the connections are undervalued but rather that certain standalone E+ passes are overvalued. Why do back 2.5 + front 1/1 for an F-equivalent skill (D skill + 0.2 CV) when a DLO is an F and so much easier? If a DLO was an E like it should be, that kind of connection would be a bit more valuable.

        As for dance elements, they make it impossible to increase the D-score too high because it’s very difficult to get credit for D dance elements. They also make routines samey because there are only a handful of C dance elements that aren’t heavily deducted, too. I agree elements should be strictly judged at all times, but routine composition is stuck right now. The floor code is such a mess. Something should be done and I don’t think it will be for the Paris code.

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    2. Judging by Tom’s Facebook posts at junior worlds, no, he doesn’t understand this. He made one post about being surprised that dance counts as much as tumbling and another post complaining about the E caps for juniors because “tumbling is our strength” and that the girls had to downgrade for junior worlds. Those posts were so disappointing to read. First of all, it should not be a surprise to someone in his position the importance of dance elements. Second, the Russian athletes managed to get high D scores without F+ elements so maybe look around and see what they have been doing. He seemed to be playing the blame game instead of working within the rules he had been given, which are the same rules as everyone else has. As Suzanne Yoculan once said, losers make excuses, winners make adjustments.

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      1. Did he really say that? That’s an embarassment. The rules have been like this for quads and junior americans have been doing just fine before he got here. God, if he starts to get people to seriously say Marta is missed (when no medals will ever make that true) with this kind of incompetence, I will be so pissed.

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  4. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this! The way you compile and sort the info is clear and educational and, like, comprehensive as hell. There always seems to be a domestic bonus/deduction that I wasn’t aware of– stick bonus this time–so your highlighting where it was awarded was much appreciated.

    Keep being the treasure that you are. ❤

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  5. this is awesome! so interesting to see.
    I would love to see more variety encouraged. I think the “dance” skills are really boring to watch – i can barely tell the difference between the different jumps and leaps and I’m pretty into this sport.
    It’d be great if the actual dancing got some sort of code value, meaning the presentation or how cohesive and on theme the gymnast moves. The Dutch gymnasts are beyond lovely in this, for example. There’s quite a difference here between Morgan or Grace or Riley and some of the others and I wish they would get additional credit for a well-constructed and presented routine.

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  6. Very much appreciated! I’m embarrassed to admit that I don’t think I noticed the difference between a split leap full and a switch full before (because confusingly, the leg still goes back in the split full).

    Anyway, I know you don’t generally answer questions in the comments, but perhaps someone else would know. Would Wong have gotten a stick bonus for her third pass? And if so, where might she have lost a tenth to even things out?

    This is why gymnastics needs to be like figure skating and public protocols.

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