All posts by balancebeamsituation

P&G Championships Preview – The Seniors

The seniors understand the importance of maintaining a little mystery. After Classic, we still have a number of routines we’re waiting to see and a couple questions that must be answered so that we can put together a presumptive worlds team heading into the selection camp portion of the season. Let’s get to it.

Note: I’ll be at nationals in the stands with the rest of the peasants (which means I won’t be live blogging).

The title

There were moments this year when it seemed the race for best female gymnast in the US might actually be up for grabs for the first time in a quad, but the upgrades and level of preparation Ragan Smith showed on bars and beam at Classic reflect a gymnast who is rising toward world-beating level. While her closest competitors are attempting to return from injury and simply maintain their previous levels, Smith is performing at a rung above.

We haven’t seen vault or floor from Smith since American Cup, but as long as she shows up with the same routines (or upgrades) and hits six or seven of her eight sets at nationals, she should be the national champion and should record the highest AA score in the world so far this year, a mark which currently sits at 57.225. Very doable.

The second AAer

Beyond Smith’s own ability, the other reason she’s currently a clear favorite to become national champion is the injury status of her closest competitors. They’re not at full strength right now, but that also means they should have an exciting race among themselves to see who gets the (potentially temporary) seat as the other member of the all-around oligarchy. Continue reading P&G Championships Preview – The Seniors

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P&G Championship Preview – The Juniors

The simplest preview of the competition at junior nationals is just Classic…but again.

Because the juniors tend to be farther along in their preparations by Classic (aiming to peak for nationals rather than for worlds/selection camp) and because their young bodies have not yet been destroyed by the harsh sands of time forcing them to skip most apparatuses at most competitions, the junior Classic acts as a far better predictor of what will happen at nationals than the senior Classic does.

For the most part, we’ve seen the routines we’re going to see.

The title

It was Emma Malabuyo who blew the field away at Classic with a two-point margin of victory, which elevated her from the #3-junior status she occupied in the long-lost past of two months ago and established her as the favorite for this week’s junior national title.

The most significant development in Malabuyo’s routines was her upgraded 5.4 D on bars, a more competitive number on a piece that had been a weakness compared to the other top US juniors. Her 14.300 on floor also demonstrated that she is able to pull in a number well above her competitors (here, there, and everywhere) by actually getting credit for all her attempted leaps. A REVOLUTION.

That doesn’t necessarily mean it’s going to be smooth sailing at nationals. Maile O’Keefe isn’t going anywhere. O’Keefe ended up being the closest to catching Malabuyo at Classic (you know, just a casual two points behind), but that performance included a fall on beam and going over on a handstand/recasting on bars. Continue reading P&G Championship Preview – The Juniors

And None for Kristen Smyth, Bye

Well, we can’t say it hasn’t been coming…

Last night, at the most inconvenient possible time, Stanford announced that Kristen Smyth has “stepped down” as head coach. You know, like coaches totally normally do for perfectly normal reasons right before the school year is about to start. Nothing to see here…

She just happened to decide to step down.

I also love that they tried to bury the story on a Friday night like they think they’re in an episode of The West Wing. You’re college gymnastics, and the gymternet is seven days a week. Continue reading And None for Kristen Smyth, Bye

Things Are Happening – August 11, 2017

A. Jake Dalton retires

Jake Dalton Toe Point has pointed its last toe. Pour out a comically large bicep. Or something. I don’t know how this works.

The bam-bam-grrr events tended to be his things, but I was always partial to parallel bars.

Year in and year out, Dalton made teams to compete the power events during an era in which he had plenty of competition for those spots. Vault/floor gymnasts like Legendre, Ruggeri, and more recently Whittenburg probably can’t count how many teams they didn’t make because their strengths overlapped too much with Dalton’s and Dalton was already a lock for the team. His execution and relative consistency allowed him to rise above the rest.

B. P&G Championship rosters

I was going to do a post about the women’s roster for nationals upon release, but it was boring so I didn’t.

The senior women’s field will be comprised of everyone who competed at Classic except Laney Madsen, who did not get her qualifying score. Victoria Nguyen is also slated to compete after pulling out of Classic with injury, and Sydney Johnson-Scharpf will appear at nationals after having her petition approved. (She was sick at Classic and also technically got the necessary qualifying score at Cracky-Scoring Iceland Meet. It just wasn’t a national team assignment and therefore didn’t count for her qualification needs.)

Several gymnasts also managed to achieve only two- or three-event qualifying scores at the classic meets, so while they were allowed to compete the AA at US Classic, they can compete only on those specific events at nationals. Here are the event scratches in spreadsheet format because of course I did.

On the junior side, the field is much smaller than it was at classic because of the somewhat harsh qualifying standard (only harsh in that scores from elite qualifiers cannot be used to qualify to nationals—the qualifying score must come from the ranch, an assignment, or a classic meet). It’s a necessary harshness, though, because otherwise the nationals field would just be too large. We still have 31 juniors making it in as is.

Sadly, Madelyn Williams—the winner of the Faux-gines Prize for Elegance from US Classic that I just awarded—is not among them as she has pulled out of nationals. Continue reading Things Are Happening – August 11, 2017

P&G Championship Preview – Gentleman Times

This is a place of honesty, so let’s be real. We’re coming up on one of the two weeks every year when you decide to start paying attention to men’s gymnastics again and suddenly have very strong opinions about it that are based on a whole lot.

It’s a gymternet tradition.

So, to get you up to speed after 12 months of not watching very much of the boys doing all the strongies and the flippies or whatever they do, here’s a little primer. We’ll all just pretend I’m not in the exact same situation as you. Suspension of disbelief!

START LIST

All-around champion

Here’s the most important thing to know: Moldauer/Modi is the new Shawn/Nastia. Everyone will need to pick a favorite right this minute and then make a screen name about it and have internet fights.

Yul Moldauer has developed into a fairly obsession-worthy character because of execution. Be fully prepared for Moldauer to show up with a D-Score total that is not only well behind Modi’s but that gives away a solid 2 points to the best AAers in the world. Moldauer is nonetheless the tentative favorite to become national champion next weekend because he can make up difficulty gaps through execution and is a plausible bet to hit a 9.0 E, even on non-vault events.

On rings, for instance, Moldauer has managed to defy the odds and become quite the competitive scorer despite not looking like Bebop and Rocksteady, because he’s just so precise.

This shouldn’t necessarily be constructed as purely a battle of execution versus difficulty, however, because it’s not like Akash Modi is some D-chucking garbage monster. Still, Modi’s best opportunities to cultivate an advantage on Moldauer will come because of D and will come on the events where he begins with a significant advantage, like pommel horse.

Continue reading P&G Championship Preview – Gentleman Times

Attack of the Side Leap

In 2016, the split jump 1/2 and straddle jump 1/2 on beam both had B value.

Oh, what simple times those were.

Carefree almost.

For 2017, both the split jump 1/2 and straddle jump 1/2 have been revalued and bumped up to C elements.

At the same time, the one-tenth difficulty bonus for leaps beginning and ending in side position has been expanded to include those leaps with just a 1/2 twist.

Add it all up, and what does that spell?

It spells that the split jump 1/2 from side position and straddle jump 1/2 from side position, elements that 9 months ago would have been B skills, are now D skills.

THIS WILL BE GREAT FOR UPGRADES.

WHAT A COOL AND TRENDY D-SCORE HACK.

NOTHING COULD GO WRONG.

NOTHING AT ALL.

THIS IS GOOD AND NORMAL.

EVEN RAGAN SMITH IS FINE WITH IT.

BEAM WILL NEVER BE THE SAME IN A GOOD WAY.

7000 WORTH-IT POINTS FOR EASY SIDE LEAPS.

IT’S SO SIMPLE DO THE DANCE.

THE FUTURE IS SIDE LEAPS.

 

 

 

Things Are Happening – August 4, 2017

A. Zero Downies

The summer of 2017 is not a great time in Downie Land—and therefore not a great time for any of us—as Ellie suddenly revealed that she has been gravely injured since March and competed at Euros even though her ankle was attached by only a single strand of floss, which seems like it would have been hard.

So, now she’s having surgery, which means we’ll have exactly zero Downies at worlds this year what with Becky’s elbow injury from Euros as well.

Ugh.

But, it also means there are some open spots to be won by gymnasts who might not previously have seemed likely to make the British worlds team, a team that looked like an inevitable Ellie, Becky, Tinks, Frags quartet only a couple months ago. Tinks and Frags are probably the top two AAers if they have their lives together, but now Georgia-Mae Fenton has a real shot at a bars spot if she can work out how not to get injured right on the eve of competitions, and then there’s room for one more. Gabby Jupp can come back and do beam, right? Right. Good idea, me.

B. Man Championships

BREAKING NEWS: When the women compete at P&G Championships two weeks from now (I’m not ready), there’s also some kind of men’s competition going on at the same time. Like a man championship. Huh. Learn something new every day.

(This year, you know the man days will be when everyone goes to Disneyland…)

USAG has the roster for us, so now we know that the men’s senior field will be as follows: Continue reading Things Are Happening – August 4, 2017

CSI: Your Floor Score

The judges are not here for your trash leaps.

At U.S. Classic, the floor-credit whip (you know that) was cracked in all directions, at everyone, frequently to the tune of 3- to 5-tenth downgrades for those attempting multiple turns and twisting leaps. Basically, if you’re wondering what elements everyone got credit for, the answer is nothing, and she didn’t.

And rightfully so.

The moral of U.S. Classic is that just because a split leap 1.5 is a D element, that doesn’t mean you should try it. Really. You won’t get credit anyway.

Let’s start with Jade Carey, who recorded a still-impressive 5.7 D that currently ranks as one of the highest in the world.

JADE CAREY
Double double tucked (H)
Double layout 1/1 (H)
Double L turn (D)
L hop 1/1 (C)
Switch leap 1/1 (D)
Front 2/1 (D)
Split leap 1.5 (D)
Double tuck 1/1 (E)
Acro – HHED = 2.5
Dance – DDDC = 1.5
Composition requirements = 2.0
CV = 0.0
Attempted D-SCORE = 6.0
 Awarded D-SCORE = 5.7

Carey has just 8 countable skills in the routine, which means she’s relying on getting full credit for all of them. Other gymnasts will throw in backup C dance elements like switch rings just in case, though the risk there is that more elements = more deductions.

In this case, Carey would not have been given the double L turn, receiving only B value for the single L turn and bringing her down to 5.8. Then, the split leap 1.5 would have been bumped down to a split leap 1/1 for C value, which brings her down to the 5.7.

We don’t know what was downgraded because we don’t get judging receipts (heaven forbid there be some transparency), but we can make educated guesses.

This isn’t a dire D situation. A 5.7 is still quite high, and she’s taking a calculated risk in the hope that occasionally she’ll receive more than 5.7. It will be tough to get credit for the split 1.5, but completing that double L to get up to 5.9 is doable and makes for a very competitive D-score.

Others were downgraded more severely.

Continue reading CSI: Your Floor Score

National Team Rankings – August 2017

How It Works
Taking into account all scores recorded at competitions in the last six months, each nation is given a team total based on what its best-scoring group of five senior gymnasts would score in a hypothetical 3-up, 3-count team final.

Individual’s scores may come from any official competition (they need not all be from the same meet), and whichever group of five gymnasts would produce the highest score is the one selected.

Countries that have not shown enough senior routines so far this year to fill a 3-up, 3-count team on each event (i.e., Slovenia, New Zealand, South Korea) are not included.

Rankings will be updated on the 1st of each month, and scores will expire after six months in order to provide the most up-to-date snapshot of where nations are at the current moment (so these current rankings include scores from February 2017–July 2017).

Last month’s ranking is in parentheses.

Previous rankings
July 2017
June 2017

1. (1) UNITED STATES – 173.850
Ragan Smith 14.433 14.550 15.350 14.000
Riley McCusker 14.600 15.050 14.200 13.500
Jade Carey 14.700 0.000 14.050 14.050
Morgan Hurd 14.700 14.200 13.650 13.850
Ashton Locklear 0.000 14.750 14.000 0.000

173.850

44.000 44.350 43.600 41.900
Scores from U.S. Classic (and American Classic) saw the US gain nearly two points on its July 1st total, predominately the result of the massive beam score from Ragan Smith that dwarfs all other counting scores by more than a point, as well as the introduction of Jade Carey’s counting scores on three events.
2. (2) JAPAN – 171.150
Asuka Teramoto 14.900 13.950 14.250 13.200
Mai Murakami 14.800 13.500 14.200 14.250
Sae Miyakawa 15.100 11.950 12.700 14.100
Shiho Nakaji 14.000 13.500 14.000 13.450
Hitomi Hatakeda 14.234 14.500 13.400 13.600
171.150 44.800 41.950 42.450 41.950
3. (3) RUSSIA – 170.881
Elena Eremina 14.466 14.850 14.066 13.800
Angelina Melnikova 14.466 14.400 14.050 14.100
Daria Spiridonova 13.600 14.700 13.850 13.050
Seda Tutkhalyan 14.333 13.366 13.533 13.366
Natalia Kapitonova 13.633 14.700 13.700 13.500
170.881 43.265 44.250 41.966 41.400
4. (4) CHINA – 170.265
Wang Yan 14.400 13.000 13.700 13.433
Luo Huan 13.650 14.533 14.750 13.150
Liu Tingting 13.700 14.366 15.300 13.566
Liu Jinru 14.550 12.550 12.250 12.850
Zhu Xiaofang 0.000 14.350 14.167 12.350
170.265 42.650 43.249 44.217 40.149
5. (6) GERMANY – 168.864
Kim Bui 13.750 14.533 12.733 13.566
Tabea Alt 14.466 14.350 14.066 13.500
Pauline Schaefer 14.100 13.500 14.150 13.533
Sarah Voss 13.750 11.750 14.100 13.150
Elisabeth Seitz 13.700 14.750 13.400 12.700
168.864 42.366 43.633 42.316 40.599
Sarah Voss’s 14.1 on beam from a heretofore unknown mystery meet in Finland proves just enough to inch Germany up ahead of Great Britain for 5th.
6. (5) GREAT BRITAIN – 168.724
Amy Tinkler 14.600 13.725 12.566 13.233
Alice Kinsella 13.750 13.391 14.050 13.150
Ellie Downie 14.950 14.400 13.550 14.066
Becky Downie 0.000 14.600 13.600 0.000
Claudia Fragapane 0.000 0.000 13.750 14.000
168.724 43.300 42.725 41.400 41.299
7. (7) FRANCE – 168.365
M De Jesus Dos Santos 14.366 14.450 14.233 13.150
Louise Vanhille 13.700 14.033 13.550 12.866
Marine Boyer 13.950 13.033 14.900 13.600
Juliette Bossu 13.800 13.900 12.550 13.600
Coline Devillard 14.633 10.800 12.433 12.166
168.365 42.949 42.283 42.683 40.350
8. (8) CANADA – 166.437
Isabela Onyshko 13.400 12.734 14.034 13.234
Shallon Olsen 14.800 12.750 12.700 13.467
Brittany Rogers 14.250 13.634 12.600 0.000
Rose Woo 14.050 13.567 13.634 13.100
Ellie Black 14.500 13.850 14.000 13.467
166.437 43.550 41.051 41.668 40.168
9. (9) ITALY – 166.366
Giada Grisetti 14.100 13.950 13.566 12.666
Desiree Carofiglio 14.000 13.200 13.350 13.750
Martina Maggio 14.800 14.050 13.850 13.400
Sofia Busato 14.550 0.000 0.000 0.000
Lara Mori 13.600 13.100 13.300 13.800
166.366 43.450 41.200 40.766 40.950
10. (10) BRAZIL – 166.350
Rebeca Andrade 15.000 13.800 13.550 13.650
Flavia Saraiva 14.300 13.750 14.100 13.900
Thais Fidelis 13.550 12.700 13.467 13.733
Carolyne Pedro 13.950 13.000 12.900 13,100
Gleice Rodrigues 0.000 13.150 10.350 11.600
166.350 43.250 40.700 41.117 41.283
11. (11) AUSTRALIA – 165.058
Emily Little 14.750 12.775 13.233 13.400
Rianna Mizzen 14.575 14.500 13.200 12.934
Georgia-Rose Brown 13.575 13.800 13.425 13.225
Georgia Godwin 13.775 13.450 12.650 13.425
Cassidy Ercole 14.075 11.650 12.200 11.200
165.058 43.400 41.750 39.858 40.050
12. (12) BELGIUM – 163.615
Senna Deriks 13.800 14.033 12.250 13.450
Nina Derwael 13.650 14.800 13.900 12.966
Maellyse Brassart 13.800 13.300 12.933 13.066
Rune Hermans 13.600 13.566 13.400 13.133
Axelle Klinckaert 0.000 13.650 0.000 0.000
163.615 41.250 42.483 40.233 39.649
13. (13) NETHERLANDS – 163.549
Eythora Thorsdottir 14.100 13.600 14.850 14.000
Sanne Wevers 0.000 0.000 14.500 0.000
Tisha Volleman 14.400 12.800 12.733 13.066
Naomi Visser 13.400 12.900 13.000 12.600
Elisabeth Geurts 13.733 11.650 12.200 12.600
163.549 42.233 39.300 42.350 39.666
14. (15) SPAIN – 162.215
Claudia Colom 13.650 11.750 13.150 12.900
Nora Fernandez 13.733 13.266 13.100 12.833
Ana Perez 14.600 13.833 13.833 13.700
Paula Raya 13.500 13.150 12.100 12.850
Cintia Rodriguez 12.933 12.733 13.200 13.200
162.215 41.983 40.249 40.183 39.800
The Spanish Championship provided an opportunity for Spain to move up in the rankings, gaining nearly two points in its previous total, largely the result of Ana Perez debuting her full difficulty on vault and floor to bump up those totals significantly. Most of her teammates also used the championship to pick up a tenth or two here and there.
15. (14) ROMANIA – 161.748
Catalina Ponor 0.000 0.000 14.566 13.433
Alexandra Mihai 13.750 0.000 12.967 12.433
Larisa Iordache 0.000 14.050 14.566 0.000
Laura Jurca 13.150 12.850 12.200 0.000
Ioana Crisan 13.600 13.100 13.150 13.100
161.748 40.500 40.000 42.282 38.966
Olivia Cimpian has been removed from Romania’s team, since it appears she has no intention of continuing to compete for Romania and is currently in citizenship limbo, which accounts for Romania’s fall in the rankings.
16. (16) HUNGARY – 159.372
Zsofia Kovacs 14.600 14.734 13.967 13.067
Dorina Boczogo 0.000 11.267 12.934 12.900
Dalia Al-Salty 13.034 11.900 12.567 12.450
Boglarka Devai 14.467 12.234 12.000 12.334
Noemi Jakab 12.567 12.334 11.967 12.534
159.372 42.101 39.302 39.468 38.501
17. (17) MEXICO – 157.672
Nicolle Castro 14.000 13.050 12.566 13.100
Jimena Moreno 13.466 12.850 12.550 12.740
Karla Vielma 13.600 12.200 12.950 12.760
Mariana Almeida 13.766 11.550 12.200 13.030
Ahtziri Sandoval 13.750 13.300 11.534 11.700
157.672 41.516 39.200 38.066 38.890
18. (18) NORTH KOREA – 157.175
Kim Su Jong 14.450 13.250 12.200 13.250
Pyon Rye Yong 14.375 11.400 13.100 12.650
Jong Un Gyong 13.400 12.100 0.000 12.700
Kim Won Yong 13.400 0.000 12.150 12.400
Jon Jang Mi 0.000 13.350 12.350 0.000
157.175 42.225 38.700 37.650 38.600
19. (19) SWITZERLAND – 156.662
Ilaria Kaeslin 13.433 12.633 13.033 13.100
Caterina Barloggio 12.150 12.800 12.100 11.750
Fabienne Studer 13.466 12.866 12.566 11.833
Lynn Genhart 13.400 12.866 12.833 12.666
Thea Brogli 13.566 12.066 13.200 12.833
156.662 40.465 38.532 39.066 38.599
20. (20) CZECH REPUBLIC – 156.600
Karolina Bartunkova 13.000 9.350 7.600 11.550
Veronika Cenkova 12.800 12.900 13.200 13.200
Vendula Merkova 12.400 12.600 13.500 13.000
Lucie Jirikova 13.200 12.850 12.200 12.950
Aneta Holasova 12.400 12.900 13.100 12.450
156.600 39.000 38.650 39.800 39.150
21. (21) UKRAINE – 156.291
Diana Varinska 0.000 13.933 12.550 12.900
Yana Fedorova 13.800 12.700 12.200 13.150
Valeria Osipova 13.558 12.600 12.500 12.400
Anastasia Beliaeva 13.350 11.350 12.550 12.350
Valeria Iarmolenko 12.000 11.750 11.350 12.700
156.291 40.708 39.233 37.600 38.750
22. (22) POLAND – 154.749
Gabriela Janik 14.033 13.400 12.933 13.100
Paula Plichta 13.467 9.950 12.333 12.733
Wictoria Lopuszanska 13.400 9.600 11.950 11.450
Klara Kopec 12.250 11.650 12.767 11.633
Alma Kuc 0.000 13.300 0.000 0.000
154.749 40.900 38.350 38.033 37.466
23. (23) ICELAND – 153.050
Andrea Orradottir 13.150 10.200 12.050 12.200
Agnes Suto 13.400 12.250 12.450 12.350
Dominiqua Belanyi 12.966 12.850 12.950 12.500
Irina Sazonova 13.400 12.850 12.550 12.350
Tinna Odinsdottir 12.933 12.100 12.450 11.750
153.050 39.950 37.950 37.950 37.200
24. (24) PORTUGAL – 152.799
Mariana Marianito 13.150 10.800 12.550 12.400
Beatriz Dias 13.250 10.000 12.400 12.250
Filipa Martins 13.500 13.666 13.500 13.250
Mariana Carvalho 13.000 11.633 12.250 11.450
Leonor Feijo 12.250 11.200 12.450 11.800
152.799 39.900 36.499 38.500 37.900
25. (25) CUBA – 152.450
Yesenia Ferrera 14.350 12.850 13.350 14.000
Marcia Videaux 13.450 13.200 12.650 13.000
Yumila Rodriguez 12.900 9.250 11.100 11.750
Norma Zamora 13.450 0.000 11.150 11.650
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
152.450 41.250 35.300 37.150 38.750
26. (NR) ARGENTINA – 152.200
Ayelen Tarabini 13.700 12.300 12.200 13.050
Augustina Pisos 13.350 12.750 12.400 12.550
Ailen Valente 0.000 11.950 10.850 11.900
Mayra Vaquie 13.500 10.900 11.700 11.150
Esperanza Fernandez 12.850 10.750 12.000 12.450
152.200 40.550 37.000 36.600 38.050
A successful national championship has Argentina debuting in the rankings at a surprising 26th. In particular, new senior Augustina Pisos, who finished 2nd overall, has provided Argentina the depth to come up with three reasonable scores per event.
27. (26) NORWAY – 151.750
Julie Soderstrom 13.350 12.000 12.400 12.350
Martine Skregelid 13.800 12.300 12.550 12.100
Solveig Berg 12.550 11.900 12.450 12.050
Victoria Bo 12.250 11.500 11.350 12.500
Thea Nygaard 13.100 11.600 12.500 12.950
151.750 40.250 36.200 37.500 37.800
28. (27) AUSTRIA – 151.500
Jasmin Mader 13.550 12.700 12.250 12.266
Bianca Frysak 12.700 12.100 11.750 12.400
Marlies Mannersdorfer 13.000 12.100 12.800 12.650
Beatrice Stritzl 12.900 11.250 10.467 12.500
Christina Meixner 12.100 7.550 12.550 11.500
151.500 39.450 36.900 37.600 37.550
29. (28) MALAYSIA – 150.982
Tan Ing Yueh 13.325 11.650 12.500 12.675
Ang Tracie 13.200 12.050 11.966 12.566
Farah Ann Abdul Hadi 13.250 12.250 11.350 13.550
Li Wen Rachel Yeoh 12.250 11.750 11.800 11.000
Azmi Nur Eli Ellina 12.400 10.500 11.900 12.350
150.982 39.775 36.050 36.366 38.791
30. (29) AZERBAIJAN – 150.416
Marina Nekrasova 13.800 10.500 13.100 13.100
Maria Smirnova 13.200 0.000 0.000 0.000
Yulia Inshina 13.266 12.300 12.250 13.100
Ekaterina Tishkova 12.766 12.400 11.100 12.300
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
150.416 40.266 35.200 36.450 38.500
31. (30) IRELAND – 149.994
Meaghan Smith 13.000 10.667 11.260 12.634
Tara Donnelly 13.350 11.800 13.050 12.250
Chloe Donnelly 13.050 8.800 12.700 12.100
Casey Bell 13.100 12.500 0.000 0.000
Paulina Wiktorczyk 0.000 12.200 10.960 0.000
149.994 39.500 36.500 37.010 36.984
32. (31) PUERTO RICO – 149.969
Andrea Maldonado 13.867 11.850 12.834 13.134
Karelys Diaz 12.950 10.800 11.934 12.450
Nicole Diaz 12.334 10.300 9.634 12.250
Paula Mejias 13.000 11.500 11.500 13.050
Bianca Leon 12.750 0.000 12.600 0.000
149.989 39.817 34.150 37.368 38.634
33. (32) GREECE – 149.816
Argyro Afrat 13.600 12.900 13.150 12.600
Paraskevi Arvanitaki 11.400 9.800 11.250 11.900
Alexandra Emeinidou 12.900 3.000 11.050 11.200
Vasiliki Millousi 0.000 12.600 13.900 0.000
Ioanna Xoulogi 0.000 0.000 12.366 12.700
149.816 37.900 35.300 39.416 37.200
34. (35) TURKEY – 149.800
Doga Ketenci 13.100 9.133 11.233 12.433
Ekin Morova 13.050 12.050 12.150 12.400
Demet Mutlu 13.550 12.750 11.200 12.700
Goksu Uctas Sanli 0.000 1.400 12.900 13.050
Cagla Altundemir 12.400 10.300 11.767 12.250
149.800 39.700 35.100 36.817 38.183
35. (33) SLOVAKIA – 149.116
Barbora Mokosova 13.800 13.667 13.400 13.033
Ema Kuklovska 13.000 10.200 12.000 11.200
Dominika Korpova 11.650 11.533 11.367 11.967
Viktoria Vydurekova 12.750 10.067 11.067 11.033
Maria Homolova 0.000 0.000 12.733 0.000
149.116 39.383 35.400 38.133 36.200
36. (36) FINLAND – 148.449
Veronika Vuosjoki 12.250 8.750 12.050 11.300
Wilma Malin 13.500 11.900 9.600 11.600
Maija Leinonen 13.350 12.300 12.233 11.966
Annika Urvikko 13.200 10.933 11.467 12.100
Helmi Murto 12.900 11.900 11.650 12.300
148.449 40.050 36.100 35.933 36.366
37. (34) COLOMBIA – 148.250
Melba Avendano 13.350 12.300 10.600 12.900
Dayana Ardila 13.800 11.800 11.400 11.900
Ginna Escobar 13.650 9.850 12.300 12.900
Valentina Pardo 12.500 11.350 0.000 11.500
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
148.250 40.800 35.450 34.300 37.700
38. (42) ISRAEL – 147.316
Ofir Netzer 13.800 10.900 11.625 12.633
Gaya Giladi 13.550 9.050 12.500 12.000
Tzuf Feldon 12.347 8.050 11.750 11.800
Shailee Weiss 13.366 10.300 11.133 12.567
Ofir Kremer 13.100 10.850 12.533 12.567
147.316 40.716 32.050 36.783 37.767
Israel received a major boost from the Maccabiah Games, with several gymnasts recording scores on events they had not competed yet this year, helping Israel gain multiple points on each and every event.
39. (37) DENMARK – 144.999
Victoria Gilberg 11.500 11.450 12.050 12.450
Mette Hulgaard 13.150 12.950 11.800 12.350
Freja Frandsen 12.700 8.800 8.250 11.100
Ida Holst 13,100 8.400 0.000 0.000
Marie Skammelsen 0.000 11.166 10.733 0.000
144.999 38.950 35.566 34.583 35.900
40. (49) KAZAKHSTAN – 144.650
Anna Geidt 11.833 11.150 9.550 11.450
Yekaterina Chiukina 13.100 10.800 12.500 13.250
Olga Bahtgalieva 12.600 9.950 10.900 11.500
Aida Bauyrzhanova 12.400 11.100 11.800 12.150
Tamara Kutichsheva 12.100 10.550 12.300 11.450
144.650 38.100 33.050 36.600 36.900
Kazakhstan rises from the depths after a national championship that provided five full gymnasts worth of scores to use.
41. (39) BELARUS – 143.860
Hanna Traukova 13.000 11.700 12.950 12.800
Svietlana Lifenka 13.000 9.330 11.730 12.300
Natalia Malaeva 12.400 8.600 10.666 10.950
Viktoria Zhuk 12.150 6.600 12.730 8.850
Dziyana Hramko 12.400 10.970 4.700 10.450
143.860 38.400 32.000 37.410 36.050
Hanna Traukova’s appearance at the Sikharulidze Cup this month provided just enough of a lift to Belarus to jump ahead of Singapore, though they ultimately lose two spots because of better gains made by other nations.
42. (38) SINGAPORE – 143.530
Nadine Joy Nathan 13.000 11.766 11.950 11.700
Janessa Dai 12.750 11.266 10.666 11.700
Colette Chan 12.350 11.166 11.566 12.000
Zeng Qiyan 12.500 11.133 10.366 11.566
Kelsie Muir 12.900 10.133 11.500 11.966
143.530 38.650 34.198 35.016 35.666
43. (40) SWEDEN – 143.350
Marcela Torres 13.150 11.650 11.700 12.500
Sigrid Risberg 12.250 11.950 7.450 12.450
Lilia Meisel 12.200 9.700 11.150 10.850
Alva Eriksson 11.150 11.050 9.000 11.350
Sofia Malmgren 12.800 0.000 11.100 11.600
143.350 38.200 34.650 33.950 36.550
44. (41) CHINESE TAIPEI – 142.675
Fang Ko Ching 13.500 11.450 12.600 12.200
Lai Pin Ju 12.900 9.650 13.175 11.850
Chen Feng Chih 12.450 10.300 10.650 10.750
Wu Sing Feng 13.300 8.450 10.700 11.050
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
142.675 39.700 31.400 36.475 35.100
45. (43) COSTA RICA – 141.450
Heika Del Sol Salas 13.300 11.850 11.550 12.150
Franciny Morales 12.850 11.200 11.650 10.950
Mariana Andrade 11.250 11.600 10.900 11.150
Ariana Castaneda 12.300 11.150 8.500 9.750
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
141.450 38.450 34.650 34.100 34.250
46. (44) VENEZUELA – 138.750
Milca Leon 12.600 11.300 9.800 11.300
Pamela Arriojas 12.000 10.550 11.650 10.650
Karla Escorche 12.750 10.550 9.800 11.450
Eliana Gonzalez 13.450 7.650 11.500 11.850
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
138.750 38.800 32.400 32.950 34.600
47. (45) INDIA – 136.250
Pranati Nayak 13.250 9.250 12.500 10.950
Aruna Budda Reddy 13.500 8.750 9.500 11.650
Dwija Asher 12.300 10.300 0.000 11.100
Pranati Das 0.000 10.750 11.050 10.350
Swastika Ganguly 12.200 0.000 9.650 0.000
136.250 39.050 30.300 33.200 33.700
48. (46) BULGARIA – 135.473
Greta Banishka 13.341 10.483 12.333 12.100
Desislava Todorova 12.333 9.400 10.800 11.666
Valentina Rashkova 12.600 0.000 0.000 0.000
Yoana Yankova 12.450 8.500 12.200 9.700
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
135.473 38.391 28.383 35.233 33.466
49. (47) GUATEMALA – 134.400
Ana Palacios 13.350 8.450 10.850 12.550
Marcela Bonifasi 11.250 9.500 11.600 12.400
Katherine Godinez 12.400 9.050 11.400 11.600
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
134.400 37.000 27.000 33.850 36.550
50. (48) PHILIPPINES – 133.100
Kaitlin DeGuzman 11.950 10.000 11.450 12.200
Cristina Onofre 12.500 9.450 10.900 11.650
Katrina Evangelista 10.800 8.800 10.750 10.850
Mariana Hermoso 0.000 8.450 10.000 11.400
Rachelle Arellano 12.050 0.000 0.000 0.000
133.100 36.500 28.250 33.100 35.250
51. (50) DOMINICAN REPUBLIC – 130.400
Yamilet Pena 14.050 12.350 10.350 11.800
Sandra Contreras 12.050 7.750 10.100 11.400
Alonda Echavarria 11.450 10.200 7.650 11.250
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
None 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
130.400 37.550 30.300 28.100 34.450

U.S. Classic – 7 Things We Learned

1) Jade Carey is a thing

Our first real-life glimpse of Jade Carey did not disappoint. On vault, Carey showed a Tsuk 2/1, followed by an Amanar (which ties for the most difficult vaulting program being done in the world right now).

Her final average for the two vaults was 14.475. That’s the kind of score that would be good enough to make event finals at worlds but is not a guaranteed-medal situation yet. There were clear deductions in these vaults, but the good news for Carey is that many were not built-in. She received a 0.3 ND on the Amanar (which she landed with more control in the touch warmup, just one crossover step), so not dancing OOB on the Amanar alone would bump her up and put her among the very best two-vault scores in the world this year.

Her Tsuk also scored 0.350 higher at the ranch than it did here, though the pronounced piking on the second twist probably keeps that E score from going too, too high. We could very well see this average go up as the summer continues, and doing so would remove some of the doubt in what already looks like a fairly compelling worlds case.

And then there’s floor.

That’s some big tumbling, you guys. Not sure if you noticed. I’m actually not mad at her 180 position on the switch full either, which is the more impressive accomplishment. The 13.950 this routine received is right on the cusp of being a worthy score to take to take to worlds for floor (I’m looking for 14s), but this was with an error on the landing of the final pass and getting nailed in the D score for completion of dance elements. The potential to break 14 at nationals exists.

Carey got a 5.7 D for this routine, but she’s going for 6.0. I’m sure she didn’t get full credit for the split leap 1.5 (it was more like a split leap 1.15), and probably got the double L downgraded to a single as well. That would get her D down to 5.7 but also reinforces how there really is room to improve on an already-competitive 13.950.

The Chaplins are like, “I KNOW, RIGHT? BLOOP.”

Vault and floor will rightfully get most of the attention, but Carey has the makings of a Sturdy German on beam as well.

2) Riley McCusker is a famous inventor

The meet didn’t go awesomely for McCusker, with mistakes on all three of her events.

At the same time, it’s just Classic, and she’s only just back from injury within the last 30 seconds. My main questions are more along the lines of why it was so important for her to compete at Classic than they are about her actual performance. Although she didn’t seem to be still suffering from any injury problems (just lack of numbers), so no harm done. This was also tons better than American Cup, a meet she was actually prepared for. Continue reading U.S. Classic – 7 Things We Learned