CSI: Your Floor Score

The judges are not here for your trash leaps.

At U.S. Classic, the floor-credit whip (you know that) was cracked in all directions, at everyone, frequently to the tune of 3- to 5-tenth downgrades for those attempting multiple turns and twisting leaps. Basically, if you’re wondering what elements everyone got credit for, the answer is nothing, and she didn’t.

And rightfully so.

The moral of U.S. Classic is that just because a split leap 1.5 is a D element, that doesn’t mean you should try it. Really. You won’t get credit anyway.

Let’s start with Jade Carey, who recorded a still-impressive 5.7 D that currently ranks as one of the highest in the world.

JADE CAREY
Double double tucked (H)
Double layout 1/1 (H)
Double L turn (D)
L hop 1/1 (C)
Switch leap 1/1 (D)
Front 2/1 (D)
Split leap 1.5 (D)
Double tuck 1/1 (E)
Acro – HHED = 2.5
Dance – DDDC = 1.5
Composition requirements = 2.0
CV = 0.0
Attempted D-SCORE = 6.0
 Awarded D-SCORE = 5.7

Carey has just 8 countable skills in the routine, which means she’s relying on getting full credit for all of them. Other gymnasts will throw in backup C dance elements like switch rings just in case, though the risk there is that more elements = more deductions.

In this case, Carey would not have been given the double L turn, receiving only B value for the single L turn and bringing her down to 5.8. Then, the split leap 1.5 would have been bumped down to a split leap 1/1 for C value, which brings her down to the 5.7.

We don’t know what was downgraded because we don’t get judging receipts (heaven forbid there be some transparency), but we can make educated guesses.

This isn’t a dire D situation. A 5.7 is still quite high, and she’s taking a calculated risk in the hope that occasionally she’ll receive more than 5.7. It will be tough to get credit for the split 1.5, but completing that double L to get up to 5.9 is doable and makes for a very competitive D-score.

Others were downgraded more severely.

DEANNE SOZA
Layout (A)
Front 1/1 (C) + Front tuck (A)
Switch ring (C)
Split leap 1.5 (D)
Double L turn (D) + Illusion (B) = 0.1 CV
Double tuck (D)
Switch leap 1/1 (D)
Double pike (D)
Acro – DDC = 1.1
Dance – DDDCB = 1.7
Composition requirements = 2.0
CV = 0.1
Attempted D-SCORE = 4.9
Awarded D-SCORE = 4.4

It seems a bit silly that Deanne Soza (OF ALL PEOPLE) was among the gymnasts who received the most severe dance element downgrades, but that’s where we are. She’s going for a number of elements that are difficult to complete, so she ended up with an intentionally downgraded routine that also got annihilated in D-score, giving her a 4.4.

That likely means she didn’t get credit for the double L turn (also losing the connection tenth), which drops her three tenths to a 4.6. It’s one of the more arguable downgrades because she does appear to complete the turn but bounces around on her heel in the second spin.

To come up with the remaining two tenths of downgrades, we’re looking at the split 1.5 getting hit (correct, it’s a split 1.25) along with the switch leap 1/1 (eh). So basically, she got full credit for two of the five dance elements she attempted, even though she’s Deanne Soza, because D credit on these twisting leaps is all about finishing position.

Her partner in losing five tenths off of her attempted D-score was Jordan Chiles.

JORDAN CHILES
Double layout (F)
Double Arabian piked (F)
Switch ring (C)
Split leap 1.5 (D)
Back 1.5 (C) +i+ Double tuck (D) = 0.1
Double wolf turn (D)
Switch leap 1/1 (D)
Double pike (D)
Acro – FFDD = 2.0
Dance – DDDC = 1.5
Composition requirements = 2.0
CV = 0.1
Attempted D-SCORE = 5.6
Awarded D-SCORE = 5.1

So basically…she didn’t get anything?

The double wolf was definitely not complete, so if we take that down to an A for a single wolf turn, that means the back 1.5 (C) counts as a fifth acro skill instead and she’s at 5.5.

Downgrading the split leap 1.5 and the switch leap 1/1 (as happened to most people) brings her down to 5.3, but then we still have two more tenths to account for. That means we’re looking at the double Arabian being credited as tucked (for a loss of one tenth) and another dance element not being recognized.

It’s most likely the switch ring getting docked for lack of arch/head release and credited as a switch split. On typical leaps (unless it’s really, really bad) lack of split is addressed in the E-score rather than the D-score. As long as the split hits 135 degrees, it’s supposed to receive credit and then be destroyed in E-score. It has to be worse than 135 degrees for the D to get involved. But the D score has more authority on switch rings.

All of those downgrades together (the double wolf, split 1.5, switch 1/1, double arabian, switch ring) would get her down to 5.1. It’s basically a credit bloodbath.

Laney Madsen’s set demonstrated the danger of relying on turns, another major downgrade possibility, just as the complex leaps are.

LANEY MADSEN
Whip (A) + Double Arabian tucked (E) = 0.2 CV
Double tuck 1/1 (E)
Switch leap (B)
Switch leap 1/2 (C)
Double Y turn (D)
Back 1.5 (C) +i+ Back 3/1 (E) = 0.2 CV
Double scorpion turn (D)
Double tuck (D)
Acro – EEEDC = 2.2
Dance – DDC = 1.1
Composition requirements = 2.0
CV = 0.4
Attempted D-SCORE = 5.7
Awarded D-SCORE = 5.3

The double scorpion turn on floor is not currently in the CoP, but all the other similar double turns on floor are D skills (L, Y, attitude), so it seems reasonable to assume that its provisional rating would follow the pattern of B for single, D for double.

If we assume that, then Madsen lost four tenths from her attempted routine, for which several probable downgrades are nominees (i.e., it could have gone lower.) I’d give her credit for the Memmel turn but would not give her the double scorpion turn, which drops the D-score two tenths. The other two tenths likely come from the 3/1 being credited as 2.5, which would be consistent with the treatment of 3/1s we saw throughout the competition.

There was a definite 3/1 crackdown here, where all those who were a 1/4 twist short did not receive credit. I’ll be fascinated to see if that’s the result of a dictum from above that will carry through to worlds. (Though the Chinese are safe regardless because you can’t downgrade a tumbling pass that has a skill connected out of it. For some reason.)

Abby Paulson was the worst hit by the 3/1 crackdown.

ABBY PAULSON
Double pike 1/1 (E)
Back 3/1 (E)
Switch ring (C)
Switch leap 1/1 (D)
Double wolf turn (D)
Back 2.5 (D) + Front tuck (A) = 0.1 CV
Split leap 1.5 (D)
Back 1.5 (C) + Front 1/1 (C) = 0.1 CV
Acro – EEDC = 1.7
Dance – DDDC = 1.5
Composition requirements = 2.0
CV = 0.2
Attempted D-SCORE = 5.4
Awarded D-SCORE = 5.0

Paulson was expected to score much closer to the top on floor, but those hopes were dashed because she attempted both a 3/1 and a 2.5 in the same routine.

When the 3/1 was downgraded to 2.5, it meant the second 2.5 was a repeated skill and not recognized, eliminating both the value of the skill and the connection tenth into the front tuck. Paulson has a backup C-valued acro element that she can count instead, so losing a whole acro skill wasn’t completely disastrous, but it did take her down to a 5.1. Then, the compulsory downgrading of the split leap 1.5 likely accounts for the 5.0.

If possible, Paulson should put the 2.5 to front tuck combo before the 3/1. That way, if the 3/1 gets downgraded, at least she still gets her connection tenth because that pass would be first.

Also having her D score destroyed because of a repeated skill was Kalyany Steele.

KALYANY STEELE
Double layout (F)
Front 2/1 (D)
Split leap 1/2 (B)
Switch leap 1/2 (C)
Double tuck (D)
Double wolf turn (D)
Split leap 1/1 (C)
Back 2.5 (D)
Acro – FDDD = 1.8
Dance – DCCB = 1.2
Composition requirements = 2.0
CV = 0.0
Attempted D-SCORE = 5.0
Awarded D-SCORE = 4.5

A big composition danger is the inclusion of a double wolf turn without a backup skill that can count in its place. The single wolf turn is an A skill, so if you’re relying on the double wolf and don’t get it, you’re suddenly counting an A instead of a D. That happened to Steele, dropping her right down to 4.7.

In addition to not receiving that turn, Steele had her split leap 1/1 downgraded to a split leap 1/2. Since she had already performed the split leap 1/2 earlier in the routine, she got no credit for it the second time and was left counting the only skill she had left, an A-value back handspring, to round out her collection of eight skills, which now consisted of two A elements.

The only three in the senior competition who received their full attempted D scores were Morgan Hurd, Alyona Shchennikova, and Abi Walker. (It appears Abi Walker even got a split 1.5 credited.)

Let’s look at Morgan Hurd’s routine and why it didn’t receive any downgrades.

MORGAN HURD
Double double tucked (H)
Double pike 1/1 (E)
Split ring leap 1/1 (D)
Front layout (B) + Front 2/1 (D) = 0.1 CV
Switch ring (C)
Split ring (C)
Double pike (D)
Acro – HEDDB = 2.3
Dance – DCC = 1.0
Composition requirements = 2.0
CV = 0.1
Attempted D-SCORE = 5.4
Awarded D-SCORE = 5.4

Hurd has made some changes to this routine from Stuttgart, changes that lower the risk for downgrades.

She has replaced the ever-downgraded split leap 1.5 with a Ferrari (still a distinct downgrade risk, though Hurd performs it better than most), and she has replaced the switch leap 1/1 with a split ring leap. That means her attempted D is a 5.4 at this point instead of the 5.5 it was at Stuttgart, but it also appears she’s more likely to get full credit for this set. And she’s still counting a B. Throw in a switch 1/2 somewhere and she makes that tenth back no problem.

It should come as no surprise that Hurd had the highest E-score on floor among the seniors by a clear margin—despite a weak landing—because when gymnasts perform uncompleted leaps that receive downgrades, it’s not just a D-score problem, it’s an E-score problem.

In a double jeopardy situation, they’re getting penalized on both scores, which can destroy a total very quickly. That’s why it’s better to perform a C element you know you can complete rather than a D element that’s going to be credited as a C anyway.

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18 thoughts on “CSI: Your Floor Score”

  1. I don’t understand why Carey wouldn’t get credited for the double-L. She definitely makes it around twice… is it because she kind of drags the leg into it at first–doesn’t get it up quick enough? That’s the only thing I could maybepossiblybutnotreally see. Super picky!!! I’m all for picky but this seems ridic.

    Possibly your best headline for a post ever, btw, and that’s saying a lot! 🙂

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    1. I was literally just about to comment this. There’s nothing wrong with that double-L and it is better than most. She definitely gets it around and doesn’t drop her heel once. She fell out a teeny tiny bit at the end but that’s certainly not grounds for downgrading.

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      1. It must be leg below horizontal. But like I’m happy they are downgrading and Bering very strict. I mean who knows if they will Ben lenient or not at worlds but having the girls make sure dance is more precise will help the E score as well (like spencer said). Plus like suprise where my d score at worlds like in 2015 or Jordyn everything in 2012.

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      2. Yes, so good to see them being realistic about D score. I wonder if this is orders coming down from Papa Liukin? Either way, this post should be required reading for the whole national team and their coaches.
        Bottom line: be like Morgan and construct routines they can get credit for.
        Thank you for pointing this out so clearly, Spencer.

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    2. The leg must remain at horizontal at the conclusion of the turn to get credit for the L turn. She completes a double turn, but her leg comes down early. I don’t know the elite code very well, but in JO I would credit this as a basic double turn.

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  2. I’m wondering if it was Carey’s L hop that got downgraded – if you look at where her right foot starts and ends, I think it’s more that 90 degrees short. I’ve watched the double L multiple times, and personally, I’d nail the L hop before the double turn.

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    1. What does an L hop get downgraded to? Is an L hop 1/2 even a thing? If so, is that worth the right amount to add up to the D score correctly?

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      1. (After a fun adventure into the code of points) It actually is! (but… why?) It’s worth a B, so that would only be a tenth lower. I guess they could also nail her for the switch full, because she did come short there, but I don’t think short enough to get downgraded. So Spencer is probably right and I was probably wrong.
        I feel like this is further evidence that gymnasts deserve to get score breakdowns. It’s not fair to make the gymnast guess what they did wrong, and it prevents them from being able to improve.

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  3. Say what you will about Madsen, I respect her choice of beautiful Y turn and scorpion turns over the over used wolf turn. Brava, Laney!

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  4. question. with the turning leaps, such as the split 1.5, does all the turning have to be finished by the time they touch they ground. Because it seems like some of them turn after they hit the ground. does that call for downgrading?

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    1. Yes, they have to finish the turn completely in the air. Gymnasts are permitted to do other jumps out of leaps, but unlike the previous code where those secondary jumps would override any D-score hits from landing short, all humps and leaps now must be completely around to receive the full credit.

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  5. Carey definitely got 2 full spins in, but the leg was slightly below horizontal nearly the entire time. So instead of getting credited with a single-L spin, I believe she got credited with the basic double turn.

    I agree with almost all of the devaluations I saw during this meet. Not getting to cover under-rotation with another jump is giving a lot of gymnasts quite a bit of trouble seeing as their jumps were not complete in the first place.

    In addition to big hits to the D-score, there were also tons of poor composition choices leading to large E-score hits. For reasons unknown, nearly everyone is ending their routines with one if not two double saltos. Almost everyoen is getting -0.3 in steps and up to 0.5 for low chests. The couple of gymnasts who actually landed without their faces nearly bashing into their knees were rightfully rewarded in their D scores (Malabuyo and Hurd).

    We saw E-scores in the upper 7s even with no fall, but Malabuyo proved even with some imperfect landings, that if you can just land with your chest up and nail your leaps, you can easily get into the upper 8s even with some form issues in the air and even a large 0.3 hop in your final pass.

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